Ghana

33.5m

Population

33%

of urban residents living in slums

3%

Urbanisation rate per year

84%

of people without safely managed sanitation

12%

of people without even basic drinking water

Worked there since 2010 | Project Locations: Accra, Kumasi, Takoradi and Tamale.

Ghana is one of the most urbanised countries in Africa with almost half the population living in towns and cities. Despite increasing prosperity, inequalities remain: a quarter of Ghana’s population lives below the poverty line; only 25% have access to basic sanitation services; and only 36% use a safely managed water source.

In Kumasi, Ghana’s second-largest city, 60% of the poorest communities rely on public toilets, with up to 1,500 people per single toilet facility.

Water services in these communities are often limited, and inevitably there is a significant impact on people’s health, dignity, safety, and economic growth. 19,000 people die of diarrhoea-related disease every year in Ghana, most of them children; most of those deaths are avoidable.

WSUP focuses on improving water and sanitation services in Accra, Kumasi and in rapidly growing towns in the Ashanti region. We work closely with municipal authorities and with international funders to improve the sanitation infrastructure and services. We also support local entrepreneurs working in the toilets and sanitation sector to grow their businesses and meet the needs of low-income communities. This includes setting up a standalone sanitation service, Clean Team, providing container-based toilets with modest monthly fees covering toilet rental.

Our work in Ghana

Building stronger utilities

Supporting sanitation businesses

A public toilet in Kumasi, Ghana

Improving schools and community WASH services

14100692

Urban residents served
since 2005

428854

People with improved water supply

1108023

People with improved sanitation

12563815

People who have received hygiene education

CASE STUDY

Faustina Boachie, Accra

“There is better understanding of the social and economic issues around access to water. The promotion means access to financial resources, as the department now has a voice within the organisation at the highest level.”

Faustina Boachie, Ghana Water Company

Faustina Boachie, the chief manager of a young department looking after low-income customers at one of the main water utilities in Ghana, has always believed in the individual value of every single client. If they struggle to pay for services, they just need to be looked at and catered for differently. Their rights and willingness to participate in the economy, however, are the same as anybody else’s.

That is why she has led the creation of a unit for low-income customers at Ghana Water Company Limited (GWCL), an idea WSUP has supported since its birth. A few years later, the unit became a department, and Ms Boachie continued her work ahead of their efforts to support low-income families.

“The Board and Management approved the upgrade to a department because they understand the benefits of serving low-income customers and driving transformational change in enabling the provision of safe water services for all, including the vulnerable,” says Ms Boachie, the chief manager of the department.

This change in status, she says, indicates that her department’s work over the years has had a positive impact on the general perception of the needs of the sector in Ghana. “There is a better understanding of the social and economic issues around access to water. The promotion means access to financial resources, as the department now has a voice within the organisation at the highest level.”

Story: https://www.wsup.com/news/upgrading-the-importance-of-low-income-customers-in-ghanas-water-sector/

 

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